Contact & Info

The Amsterdam Privacy Conference (APC) is a biennial conference organized by the Amsterdam Platform for Privacy Research (APPR), a group consisting of more than 70 researchers at the University of Amsterdam who are involved with privacy aspects in their daily activities. They all approach this topic from different angles, such as law, philosophy, economics, computer science, medicine, communication studies, political science, etc. Through an interdisciplinary approach and joint discussion, APPR increases both the understanding and awareness of privacy issues. More information can be found here.

General information: mail Bart van der Sloot at info@apc2015.net

 

Themes:

(1) Commercial value of privacy

Personal data are important drivers behind new business models serving the interests and needs of industry and consumers. The exploitation of personal data has become a business in itself. This theme seeks to further analyse the business models, the dynamics involved and the contribution to welfare.

Theme coordinator

Arie den Boon: Arie den Boon is the CEO and Founder at April Analytics and Visiting Professor at University of Amsterdam in the Department of Communication Science. In the past, he was the founder of GfK Daphne Communication Management.

Tracks:

The Commercial Value of Privacy I

The Commercial Value of Privacy II

The Commercial Value of Privacy III

The Commercial Value of Privacy IV

Contact:

Please contact Arie den Boon at commercial@apc2015.net

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(2) Privacy and healthcare

In the field of medicine and healthcare, the subject’s right to privacy is of fundamental importance. Some of the relevant privacy issues in this field are the security of health information, electronic health information exchange, personal health records, biobanking, and total genome analysis.

Theme coordinators

Corrette Ploem is an experienced researcher in the field of health law, especially with regard to topics as medical research, privacy protection and new technologies.

 

and Beer Franken, who is Chief information security & privacy protection officer at the Academic Hospital of Amsterdam

 

 

Tracks:

Privacy and healthcare I

Privacy and healthcare II

Privacy and healthcare III

Privacy and healthcare IV

Contact:

Please contact Maarten van Woelderen at health@apc2015.net

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(3) Privacy in the Information Society

Democratic societies depend on making information public, a process which has undergone significant changes as a result of the Internet. Privacy is challenged by the media, cultural heritage and personal records; other important topics are government transparency, e-government, re-use of public sector information, social networks & their monetization, digital identities, access to knowledge and profiling.

Theme coordinator

Frederik is a researcher at the Institute for Information Law (IViR) of the University of Amsterdam. His research interests include profiling, privacy, freedom of expression, and discrimination. He has published widely on these topics, and regularly presents at international conferences. He published his first book in 2015: ‘Improving Privacy Protection in the Area of Behavioural Targeting.’

Tracks:

Privacy in the Information Society I

Privacy in the Information Society II

Privacy in the Information Society III

Privacy in the Information Society IV

Contact:

Please contact Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius at informationsociety@apc2015.net

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(4) Privacy and Security

Privacy is challenged by a continuous stream of security and public safety measures. Surveillance, data retention, wiretapping and border controls – which are often designed in the name of countering terrorism – have substantial implications for privacy and data retention. The privatization of security and the involvement of private actors including banks in data gathering and analysis, also play a role in the privacy challenges of contemporary security practice. This conference theme explores the politics and theory of the changing privacy-security relationship,including important European cases such as PNR, SWIFT and Cybersecurity. It also explores the theoretical and conceptual implications of these programmes for existing conceptualizations and codifications of privacy.

Theme coordinators

Willemijn Aerdts is a teacher at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies and specializes in Intelligence Studies. She studied Public International Law and International Relations in Historical Perspective in Utrecht, Netherlands. She has worked as a researcher at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. At this time she the co-chair of the Worldconnectors and associated as a Global Shaper to the World Economic Forum.

 

Martine Beijerman is PhD researcher at University of Amsterdam, faculty of Law, lecturer at the University of Amsterdam, Ad de Jonge Center for Intelligence and Security Studies, and managing director of Foundation Join for Joy. In the past, Martine worked for BKB, a campaign agency

Tracks:

Privacy and Security I

Privacy and Security II

Privacy and Security III

Privacy and Security IV

Contact:

Please contact the themeleader at security@apc2015.net

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(5) Privacy and technology

Privacy may be protected in different ways and by different means. Privacy by design and privacy impact assessments, stakeholder and public interest analyses and privacy governance, assessments of current legal and regulatory schemes, as well as interoperability of international legal frameworks are relevant topics. Aspects of trust and (distributed) systems security and privacy enhancing technologies are important to protect privacy in practice.

Theme coordinator

Sander Klous is professor at the University of Amsterdam in Big Data Ecosystems for Business and Society at the Faculty of Science. He researches the way in which business and society can maximise the benefits of insights gained through data analysis. His research involves bridging technical requirements (processing of large quantities of data into useable insights) with social requirements (fulfilling social demands in terms of privacy and convenience) and the translation of theory into practice. 

Tracks:

Technology and privacy I

Technology and privacy II

Technology and privacy III

Technology and privacy IV

Contact:

Please contact Sander Klous at technology@apc2015.net

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(6) Value of Privacy

The value of privacy is subject to continuous debate, and concerns such aspects as the universality, subjectivity and contextuality of privacy. Philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological perspectives on this topic are combined in this theme to gain new and innovative insights.

Theme coordinator

Marjolein Lanzing is currently a PhD student at the Department of Philosophy and Ethics at the Eindhoven University of Technology. Her research ‘The Transparent Self: Identity and Relationships in a Digital Age’ will contain a normative interpretation of the changing norms of privacy under the perspective of the changing meaning of the Self in a digital age.

Tracks:

The Value of Privacy I

The Value of Privacy II

The Value of Privacy III

The Value of Privacy IV

Contact:

Please contact Marjolein Lanzig at value@apc2015.net

 

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(7) Transformation of the public space and personalized communication

News media track consumers to offer more “personally relevant” content; Google and Facebook “personalize” search results; politicians adjust their messages to the preferences of individual voters; governments explore the possibilities of algorithmic decision making through smart health, smart cities or consumer applications. This track focuses on the transformation of public space. It explores how well-known social platforms, like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Wikipedia, and Flickr, co-evolve with larger social and cultural trends and simultaneously empower and disempower citizens.

Theme coordinators

Thomas Poell is assistant professor of New Media and Digital Culture at the Department of Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. He studied political science at the University of Amsterdam (NL) and The New School for Social Research (US). In 2007, he defended his PhD-dissertation on the democratization and centralization of the Dutch state during the revolutionary period around 1800. Currently, his research is focused on social media and the transformation of public communication in different parts of the world.

Jo Pierson is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communication Studies at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. He is also Senior Researcher and staff member at the research centre iMinds-SMIT (Studies on Media, Information and Telecommunication) since 1996, in charge of the research on privacy in social, mobile and ubiquitous media. Drawing upon science and technology studies and media-sociological approaches, his research focus is on privacy, surveillance, datafication, and user empowerment in digital media.

 

Natali Helberger is professor in Information Law at the Institute for Information Law. She studied Law at the Freie Universität Berlin. She received her doctarate from the University of Amsterdam. Her thesis, Controlling Access to Content: Regulating Conditional Access in Digital Broadcasting (2005), examines the regulation of digital gateways and their implications for information law and policy, competition, freedom of expression and the interests of users.

Tracks:

Transformation of the public space and personalized communication I

Transformation of the public space and personalized communication II

Transformation of the public space and personalized communication III

Transformation of the public space and personalized communication IV

Contact:

Please contact Thomas Poell at transformation@apc2015.net

 

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Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) Amsterdam

News media track consumers to offer more “personally relevant” content; Google and Facebook “personalize” search results; politicians adjust their messages to the preferences of individual voters; governments explore the possibilities of algorithmic decision making through smart health, smart cities or consumer applications. This track focuses on the transformation of public space. It explores how well-known social platforms, like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Wikipedia, and Flickr, co-evolve with larger social and cultural trends and simultaneously empower and disempower citizens.

Theme coordinator

Chris Jay Hoofnagle teaches computer crime law, internet law, privacy law, and a seminar on the Federal Trade Commission. He is the author of Federal Trade Commission Privacy Law and Policy (forthcoming Cambridge University Press) and is affiliate faculty at the School of Information. Hoofnagle has written extensively in the fields of information privacy, the law of unfair and deceptive practices, consumer law, and identity theft. His recent work includes: Free: Accounting for the Costs of the Internet's Most Popular Price, 61 UCLA L. Rev. 606 (2014) (with Jan Whittington); Alan Westin's Privacy Homo Economicus, 49 Wake Forest L. Rev. 261 (2014) (with Jennifer Urban); Unpacking Privacy's Price, 90 North Carolina L. Rev. 1327 (2012) (with Jan Whittington); and Behavioral Advertising: The Offer You Cannot Refuse, 6 Harvard L. & Policy Rev. 273 (2012).

The program committee for PLSC Amsterdam is:

  • Kenneth Bamberger, Berkeley Law
  • Frederick Borgesius, IViR
  • Lee Bygrave, University of Oslo
  • Natali Helberger, IViR
  • Paul De Hert, Vrije Universiteit Brussels – Tilburg University
  • Chris Jay Hoofnagle, UC Berkeley
  • Kristina Irion, IViR
  • Bert-Jaap Koops, Tilburg Law School, Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology, and Society (TILT)
  • Neil Richards, Washington University School of Law
  • Bart van der Sloot, IViR
  • Nico van Eijk, IViR

Organizing Committee

 

Nico van Eijk

Nico van Eijk is Professor of Media and Telecommunications Law and Director of the Institute for Information Law (IViR, Faculty of Law, University of Amsterdam). He also works as an independent legal adviser. Among other things, he is the Chairman of the Dutch Federation for Media and Communications Law (Vereniging voor Media- en Communicatierecht, VMC), a member of the supervisory board of the Dutch public broadcasting organisation (NPO) and chairman of two committees of The Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER).

Beate Roessler

Beate Roessler is professor of ethics at the University of Amsterdam; she formerly taught philosophy at the Free University, Berlin, at the University of Bremen, and at Leiden University. In 2003/4 she was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin. She is a co-editor of the European Journal of Philosophy and a  co-director of the research program Philosophy and Public Affairs (Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis, ASCA); at present, she is head of the department of philosophy; most recently published: Social Dimensions of Privacy. Interdisciplinary Perspectives (ed. with D.Mokrosinska), Cambridge UP 2015.

 

 

Edo Roos Lindgreen

Edo Roos Lindgreen is Partner at KPMG Advisory and a part-time professor of IT & Auditing at the University of Amsterdam. His professional focus areas are information governance, information security and information risk management. In other words, how do organisations use information to reach their strategic goals? And how do they manage the ensuing risks? At the University of Amsterdam, he is the program director of the Amsterdam IT-Audit Programme (AITAP). This two-year postmaster programme offers its students an exciting journey through information governance and IT-auditing. The programme is accredited by the professional association for IT-auditors in The Netherlands.

Bart van der Sloot

Bart van der Sloot is a researcher at the Institute for Information Law (IViR, Faculty of Law, University of Amsterdam). He specializes in privacy and is the coordinator of the APPR. After studying at the universities of Nijmegen, Amsterdam, Perugia and Bologna, he completed the interdisciplinary research honours programme in 2008; he graduated in Philosophy in 2009 and in Law in 2010. Funded by a Top Talent grant from the Dutch Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), he will start a PhD project in which he will assess the benefits of a virtue-based, instead of the current right-based approach to privacy regulation.

 

 

 

The Organizing Committee can be contacted at organizingcommittee@apc2015.net